Growing Your Hot Pepper


Hot peppers add zest and heat to numerous dishes. They can be consumed red or greenfresh, cooked or dried.

Preparing for your journey

  • Collect yourself. Bring your kit into focus and familiarize yourself with its contents.
  • Pick a good location. Hot pepper will grow best in a location that gets 6 to 8 hours of full sun daily.
    • If you’re planning on cooking with these plants, plant them in clean soil, use organic fertilizers, don’t use insecticides, and grow them away from driveways and busy streets so that exhaust won’t settle on the plants. 

How to plant hot pepper

  • Sow the seeds. Lay the seeds on the soil bed and cover. Plant at least 5 seeds about ¼-inch deep into a single pot.
  • Keep it moist. Leaving the pot completely open will allow to much heat to enter and moisture to escape, causing fewer seeds or no seeds to germinate. To prevent this, use a clear plastic bag or wrap, spray the inside with water, and use it to cover the pot. Secure it with a rubber band so the seeds can properly germinate. When your seeds germinate, remove the plastic bag.
    • Our Signature Potting Mix is designed to retain moisture, but you must still water your plant at least twice a day. During the dry seasons, you may water your plant freely.
    • Make sure the water reaches the roots! Place a tray or saucer under your pot so you can water your plant without spillage.
  • Thin your seedlings. Give each plant room to grow. Remove plants that are growing too close together, leaving one plant left to grow in a single pot. You may discard the others or you may transplant them to another pot. Note that transplanting them may damage the roots of the plant, lowering its survival rate.
    • Only perform thinning after the emergence of true leaves (the 4th leaf).
  • Trim your plant. Once the stems reach 6 inches in length, it is ready to be harvested. Cut up to 2/3 of the leaves each week, as this will encourage the plant to keep growing.
    • If flowers buds grow, remove them. They create a hormone change that will reduce the flavor of the leaves. This is called bolting.
  • Transplant. When your plant reaches 6 inches, you may transfer it to a bigger pot to allow its roots to fully develop.

Feeding your hot pepper

  • Fertilize your plant. Fertilizers help your plant fight harmful pathogens and become its best self. When your hot pepper seeds germinate or sprout in about 5-10 days, use Morning Miracle and Bloom Serum.
    • Bury 1 Morning Miracle caplet in the soil close to your seedlings twice a week. Be careful not to destroy their roots.
    • Apply 5 drops of Bloom Serum on your plant twice a week. You may drop the serum on the leaves and flowers to ensure healthy growth.
  • Water your plant generously after dosages of Morning Miracle and Bloom Serum. Our signature fertilizers are highly concentrated!

Tip: Our signature plant food are rich with live micro-organisms. Store them in a cool dark, and dry area. Read more about our signature plant food here!

How to harvest hot pepper

  • The best thing about a plant is that it's a gift that keeps on giving. Around 45 days after transplanting, it will start to flower. In 50-60 days, you may start to harvest your peppers.

How to store hot pepper

  • The best place to store fresh peppers is in the refrigerator. Simply place the peppers into a plastic bag and keep them in your refrigerator vegetable drawer. Optimal temperature is between 40-45°F.
  • You do not need to wash the peppers before storing. It is best for them to be dry, as water can speed up the rotting process.

The journey of planting is best enjoyed with others. Teach your family and friends. Let them taste your harvest.

Share your #seedibles journey with us! Tag us on Facebook and Instagram.

 


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